Congressional Republicans vs. Critical Race Theory

     State legislatures are not the only legislative bodies that are taking a stand against Critical Race Theory. Several bills have been introduced in Congress by Republicans to enshrine the now rescinded Executive Order № 13950 in actual law.

     Sen. Tom Cotton has introduced Senate bill 2346:

     Rep. Dan Bishop, et al., has introduced House resolution 3179, which reads in part:

A Federal entity may not grant Federal funds to any entity that teaches or advances any of the following:

(1) Any race is inherently superior or inferior to any other race.

(2) The United States is a fundamentally racist country.

(3) The Declaration of Independence or the United States Constitution are fundamentally racist documents.

(4) An individual’s moral worth is determined by his or her race.

(5) An individual, by virtue of his or her race, is inherently racist or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously.

(6) An individual, because of his or her race, bears responsibility for the actions committed by members of his or her race.

     Sen. Ted Cruz introduced Senate bill 2221, which reads in part:

(d) Limitation On Funds.—An Executive agency or any other recipient of Federal funds may not use Federal funds to teach or advance the idea, or otherwise award any grant or subgrant using Federal funds to any Executive agency, entity, or individual that teaches or otherwise advances the idea, that—

(1) one race is inherently superior or inferior to another race;

(2) an individual or a group of individuals, by virtue of the race of the individual or group of individuals—

(A) is superior or inferior to another individual, or a group of individuals, who is of a different race;

(B) bears responsibility or moral culpability for the actions committed by other individuals who are of the same race as the individual or group of individuals; or

(C) is inherently racist or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously;

(3) the race of an individual or a group of individuals is determinative of the moral worth of the individual or group of individuals;

(4) the United States is a fundamentally racist country; or

(5) the founding documents of the United States, including the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States, are fundamentally racist documents.

     Rep. Jody Hice introduced House resolution 3249, which reads in part:

(b) Race Or Sex Stereotyping Or Scapegoating Defined.—For the purposes of this Act, the term “race or sex stereotyping or scapegoating” consists of the following list of prohibited divisive concepts:

(1) One race or sex is inherently superior to another race or sex.

(2) The United States is fundamentally racist or sexist.

(3) An individual, by virtue of his or her race or sex, is inherently racist, sexist, or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously.

(4) An individual should be discriminated against or receive adverse treatment solely or partly because of his or her race or sex.

(5) Members of one race or sex cannot and should not attempt to treat others without respect to race or sex.

(6) An individual’s moral character is necessarily determined by his or her race or sex.

(7) An individual, by virtue of his or her race or sex, bears responsibility for actions committed in the past by other members of the same race or sex.

(8) Any individual should feel discomfort, guilt, anguish, or any other form of psychological distress on account of his or her race or sex.

(9) Meritocracy or traits such as a hard work ethic are racist or sexist, or were created by a particular race to oppress another.

     Doubtless such bill/resolution introductions will continue, at least until they are passed in 2025 at the earliest.

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